‘Autumn’ by Ali Smith

Autumn book coverI liked it so much that I sat down and straightaway reread Autumn by Ali Smith [London: Penguin, 2017]. Short-listed for this year’s Man Booker, what’s not to like about it? Apart from Smith’s gift for language, patterning, sound games, literary allusions (two in the first two lines) and alliterations, reminding and moving to and fro with such a light touch, the front cover of my copy has a wonderful David Hockney and the inside back cover is illustrated by that fascinating yet too little known female British Pop artist, Pauline Boty. If the Tate do a Boty retrospective I hope Ali Smith will be invited to open it. She also deserves credit for the first ‘Brexit’ novel and, had I been revising my dissertation on the influence of Margaret Thatcher on contemporary fiction, I would need to include this quotation. Read more ...

‘Expo 58’ by Jonathan Coe

Expo 58 book coverThe first of the post-war World Fairs was held in Brussels in 1958: I remember it well.  Jonathan Coe captures the flavour of it in his recent Expo 58 [London: Viking, 2014].  One of my own tweed designs was on show in the British Pavilion and for no better reason than that I travelled over to see it and to gaze in awe at the many international stands dominated by those of the USA and the USSR, rivals in everything from industry to ideology.  What did Britain hope to gain from its participation?  Coe sums up where Britain was starting from. Read more ...

‘J’ by Howard Jacobson

'J' book cover imageHoward Jacobson is a writer of consummate skill and his most recent novel with its shortest of all possible title J [London: Jonathan Cape, 2014] was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. He won that prize in 2010 with the extremely witty and wonderfully funny The Finkler Question. Jacobson is very much a Jewish writer with Jewish characters, often it seems doppelgänger for the author, and Jewish themes and problems as the main strands of their narratives. However, he writes from a cultural rather than a religious perspective. So; what to make of J which one could say conforms to this pattern? That is a harder than usual question. Read more ...

‘1Q84’ by Haruki Murakami

Devoted readers of Murakami’s novels, in more than forty languages, will wonder how it has taken me so long to get here. Now I have arrived, I am taking up permanent residence. 1Q84 [London; Vintage, 2012 translated by Jay Rubin and Philip Gabriel] was published in Japan in 2009/10 and it just happened to jump off the shelf when I was passing it recently. It’s a marvellous book that combines adventure, romance, philosophy, fantasy, deep understanding of loneliness and a compelling, beautifully written, page-turning narrative. What a discovery! Read more ...